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Jerry Reinsdorf Caught Doing His Thing

This post originally appeared on The Catbird Seat.

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By Chris Lamberti and James Fegan

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Jerry Reinsdorf and his foibles are a bit of a pet topic for James Fegan and Chris Lamberti, mind patient so they couldn’t resist taking some time out to discuss his recent brush with national prominence.

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James: Last week, we were treated to New York Times reports that Jerry Reinsdorf is mobilizing against the peaceful, albeit highly nepotistic, transition of the commissioner-ship from Sir Bud, the Mad King to his loyal right hand Rob Manfred.

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Chris: In a showdown that Jeff Passan describes as a power grab, Reinsdorf intends on blocking the confirmation of Selig’s hand-picked successor Manfred as commissioner of Major League Baseball. Manfred is a commissioner’s office insider who has the experience, credentials, and personality to woo owners and keep the baseball money train a-chuggin. However, Reinsdorf, who has always fancied himself a small-market owner operating in a big city (this position is debatable but that’s another story) considers Manfred a “sinner” in two ways according to Passan:

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Manfred recognizes the large markets ultimately run the game because they’re the ones that generate massive revenue. That one is forgivable because, well, it’s true. More egregious is this: Manfred calls Reinsdorf out on his politicking. And the only thing more dangerous than a powerful man is one who tells the truth about how he lassoed that power.

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The surprise is that Reinsdorf is pitting himself against Selig; the two have been described often as old pals. Apparently Reinsdorf’s chumminess with Selig was contingent upon having a direct line to the commissioner’s office. Now that Manfred is threatening not to extend Reinsdorf the same courtesy, Bud is dead to Jerry.

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Fewer Fans, Bigger Money: The New Economics of Chicago Baseball

\n\n\n \n\nFewer and fewer people are attending Major League Baseball games in Chicago, unhealthy sickness yet our major league teams are increasing rapidly in value.\n\nThat’s what graphing Cubs and White Sox attendance and Forbes team values from 2003-2011 tells us.\n Continue reading